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Coronavirus threat emerging (SARS-like), called MERS-CoV


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#1 silylene

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 01:50 PM

I have been watching this for the past couple of months and it is becoming more concerning.
- ~50% fatality rate.
- 5 more cases yesterday, and a second fatality in France, and rate of new cases is increasing
- human-to-human transmission strongly suspected.
- originated in Saudi Arabia. Spreading to nearby countries such as Yemen, and also into France and Italy via air travel.
- animal reservoir source is unknown.
- The Hajj is Hajj is October 13-18, 2013, and 5+ million people will travel to Mecca and live denseley crowded in tents with minimal sanitation, mingle in huge crowds, and then travel back to their homes across the world. The Hajj is a threat to the world as it may spread the virus across the planet.





New virus called ‘threat to the entire world’

The first death in France from a new SARS-like coronavirus brings the worldwide total for the disease to 27 deaths and 49 infections, CNN reports.

The 65-year-old Frenchman was diagnosed after returning from a stay in Dubai.

According to CNN, the World Health Organization has said the disease was first seen in Saudi Arabia last year. The virus is "a threat to the entire world," Dr. Margaret Chan, WHO's general director, told the network.
The Centers for Disease Control explains that coronaviruses can affect people or animals and, in worst-case scenarios, cause SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). And it notes there's currently no vaccine to protect against human coronavirus infection.

The disease acts like a cold and causes upper respiratory system problems. Symptoms include fever and cough and can lead to kidney failure and pneumonia.

The WHO has not learned how the new virus spreads, making it difficult to prevent infections. The organization has named it, though: Middle East respiratory symptom coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, according to CNN.

#2 Dewtey

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:00 PM

Oh, wonderful... /sarc

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#3 owlhoot

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 04:12 PM

Engineered virus... or just a fluke? A 50% mortality rate is unusually high!

Remembering those who served:

WITHHONOR


#4 newsartist

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 04:28 PM

... A 50% mortality rate is unusually high!


We need to know the level of medical care that the dead received, and also their general health prior.

That is a small sample to study so far, but there may be a pattern?

(dos)

Edited by newsartist, 29 May 2013 - 04:29 PM.


#5 silylene

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 09:41 PM


... A 50% mortality rate is unusually high!


We need to know the level of medical care that the dead received, and also their general health prior.


Most of them had modern state of the art hospitals, for example in France and the last 20 or so cases in S. Arabia. There is a whole thread on another forum I visit puzzling out why the drug therapies aren't working.

#6 silylene

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 08:34 AM

Mods, please fix the typo in the thread title "Coronavirus"

More news:
  • So far just 17 people of the 49 infected have recovered sufficient to be released from the hospital. 27 deaths.
  • A minimum of 22 cases are within 'clusters', likely human-to-human, 12 deaths from this group. At least 3 of these clusters were transmission occuring within a hospital setting.
  • Jordan (country) is sending 124 lab samples from patients in hospitals sent for lab testing. Possible coronavirus, or maybe something else. Of this cluster, 13 cases of acute pneumonia-like symptoms, 2 deaths. Patient 1 traveled from S. Arabia.
  • New case in Morocco, travel from S. Arabia.
  • Just 4 months until the Hajj starts ! *cringe*

More dteails on the latest 5 Saudi cases, and the new death in France:

MERS-COV - EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (13): SAUDI ARABIA, WHO
********************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

In this update:
[1] Saudi Arabia (Eastern Province): new locale, WHO
[2] Saudi Arabia: Ministry of Health, new case, deaths
[3] Saudi Arabia (Eastern Province): susp. new cluster

******
[1] Saudi Arabia (Eastern Province): new locale, WHO
Date: Wed 29 May 2013
Source: WHO Global Alert and Response (GAR), Disease Outbreak News [edited]
http://www.who.int/c...v/en/index.html


Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus - update 29 May 2013
-----------------------------------------------------------------
The Ministry of Health in Saudi Arabia has notified WHO of an additional 5 laboratory-confirmed cases with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

All 5 patients are from the Eastern region of the country, but not from Al-Ahsa, where an outbreak began in a health care facility in April 2013. The patients had underlying medical conditions which required multiple hospital visits. The government is conducting investigations into the likely source of infection in both the health care and the community settings.

The 1st patient is a 56 year old man with underlying medical conditions, who became ill on 12 May 2013 and died on 20 May 2013. The 2nd patient is an 85 year old woman with underling medical conditions who became ill on [17 May 2013] and is currently in critical condition. The 3rd patient is a 76 year old woman with underlying medical conditions who became ill on 24 May 2013 and was discharged from the hospital on 27 May 2013. The 4th patient is a 77 year old man with underlying medical conditions who became ill on [19 May 2013] and died on 26 May 2013. The 5th patient is a 73 year old man with underlying medical conditions who became ill on [18 May 2013] and died on 26 May 2013.

In addition, an 81 year old woman case reported earlier from Al-Ahsa, has died. The government is continuing to investigate the outbreaks in the country.

In France, the 1st laboratory-confirmed case in the country, with recent travel from the United Arab Emirates has died.

Globally, from September 2012 to date, WHO has been informed of a total of 49 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with MERS-CoV, including 27 deaths.

WHO has received reports of laboratory-confirmed cases originating in the following countries in the Middle East to date: Jordan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). France, Germany, Tunisia, and the United Kingdom also reported laboratory confirmed cases; they were either transferred for care of the disease or returned from the Middle East and subsequently became ill. In France, Tunisia, and the United Kingdom, there has been limited local transmission among patients who had not been to the Middle East but had been in close contact with the laboratory-confirmed or probable cases.

Based on the current situation and available information, WHO encourages all member states to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.

Health care providers are advised to maintain vigilance. Recent travellers returning from the Middle East who develop SARI should be tested for MERS-CoV as advised in the current surveillance recommendations. Specimens from patients' lower respiratory tracts should be obtained for diagnosis where possible. Clinicians are reminded that MERS-CoV infection should be considered even with atypical signs and symptoms, such as diarrhoea, in patients who are immunocompromised.

Health care facilities are reminded of the importance of systematic implementation of infection prevention and control (IPC). Health care facilities that provide care for patients suspected or confirmed with MERS-CoV infection should take appropriate measures to decrease the risk of transmission of the virus to other patients, health care workers, and visitors.

All member states are reminded to promptly assess and notify WHO of any new case of infection with MERS-CoV, along with information about potential exposures that may have resulted in infection and a description of the clinical course. Investigation into the source of exposure should promptly be initiated to identify the mode of exposure, so that further transmission of the virus can be prevented.

WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event nor does it currently recommend the application of any travel or trade restrictions.

WHO continues to closely monitor the situation.

--
communicated by:
ProMED-mail rapporteur Marianne Hopp

[According to the WHO report, the global total of confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection is now 49, including 27 deaths. This count includes the 5 new cases, including 3 deaths, reported on the Saudi Ministry of Public Health website on 28 May 2013 (see ProMED-mail post MERS-CoV - Eastern Mediterranean (12): Saudi Arabia, France 20130528.1741836). Of note in the statement above is the mention that these 5 newly reported cases were from a location different from Al-Ahsa in the Eastern Province and may represent a new cluster.

#7 Dewtey

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:36 AM

Fixed title.

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#8 silylene

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 01:08 PM

Current: 51 cases, 31 deaths.
  • New cluster in Italy today: 1 confirmed (traveled to Jordan), two family members likely infected w test pending, 15 doctors/nurses at the hospital under observation, containment measures implemented.
  • New possible cluster in France: 8 people. test underway.
  • Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !

CNN article:
Why MERS virus is so scary

ditor's note: Laurie Garrett is senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations and a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist.
(CNN) -- The head of the World Health Organization warned the world this week of a new virus, awkwardly dubbed MERS-CoV, found in Saudi Arabia.

"Looking at the overall global situation, my greatest concern right now is the novel coronavirus," Margaret Chan said, calling it "a threat to the entire world."

"We understand too little about this virus when viewed against the magnitude of its potential threat," the director general said in her closing speech to the 66th session of the World Health Assembly. "Any new disease that is emerging faster than our understanding is never under control.

"These are alarm bells and we must respond. The novel coronavirus is not a problem that any single affected country can keep to itself or manage all by itself."


With just 49 cases of the new disease reported since June 2012, it may seem puzzling that Chan named the Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus -- MERS CoV or MERS for short -- the greatest threat to world health today.
But Hong Kong-born Chan can be forgiven a strong reaction. After all, she managed the response to SARS there in 2003, and MERS is a close genetic cousin. At least 8,000 people in 30 countries contracted SARS in 2003; 774 died of the disease.
No doubt her sense of urgency also stems from the apparently high mortality rate: To date, 27 of the 49 people who have caught the disease have perished, or 52%. Although the majority of illnesses have been in the Saudi Arabia, cases have emerged in seven countries.
Similarities between the SARS and MERS viruses are more than genetic. Both cause acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS, and trigger reactions in the human immune system that are so severe, organs throughout the body are devastated -- collateral damage in an overly vigorous battle with the microbes. Both viruses spread between people through close contact, putting family caregivers and health care workers at risk for infection.

In April, for example, according to a report in the British medical journal The Lancet, a French man who had traveled to Dubai fell ill with the disease in France, although it wasn't diagnosed immediately. Another patient who shared the first man's hospital room caught the disease. The first man died on May 28; the second remains in intensive care.
A new report in the New England Journal of Medicineoffers a glimpse of the depth of mystery shrouding MERS. A team of Saudi Ministry of Health researchers describe a November outbreak in a Riyadh urban household of 28 extended family members, four of whom -- all men -- contracted MERS.
The cluster of cases in this family presents a list of mysteries: Why were all the sick and dead men? With 28 people in this three-building urban household, why were these four infected, and the other 24 spared? The family lived in a big city, had no animals, ate supermarket food and had jobs that offered no contact with the virus. How did they catch MERS?
Until researchers can determine what animal is the natural host of the virus, and how MERS spreads from the host to humans, each new outbreak is dangerous and mysterious. The science is still unfolding.
Meanwhile, the WHO and world health community watch, anxiously, recalling how swiftly the SARS outbreak that started in southern China in December 2002 exploded a month later across Asia, Canada, and on, eventually hitting 30 countries.
Sadly, resources for confronting such outbreaks have decreased since the 2008 financial crisis, and MERS has emerged in one of the most difficult regions in the world. Were the virus to reach any of the refugee camps that house more than 2 million Syrian refugees, a genuine pandemic could ensue.

#9 silylene

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 06:44 AM

According to PROMED, globally now 58 certified cases and 32 deaths. 3 more cases and 1 more death, all from Saudi Arabia.

Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !



MERS-COV - EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (26): SAUDI ARABIA, CASES, DEATH, WHO
**********************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post

http://www.promedmail.org

[1] Saudi Arabia: 3 new cases, 1 new death, MOH
Date: Wed 12 Jun 2013
Source: Ministry of Public Health, Saudi Arabia [edited]
http://www.moh.gov.s...-06-12-001.aspx


Within the framework of the epidemiological surveillance of the novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the Ministry of Health (MOH) has announced that 3 new cases of this virus have been recorded. The 1st case is a Saudi female citizen in the Eastern region, aged 63, who is suffering from chronic diseases, and her condition is stable. The 2nd one is a Saudi citizen in Al-Ahsa governorate, aged 75, who is suffering from chronic diseases as well, and still at ICU receiving the proper treatment. However, the 3rd case is a resident, aged 21, in Hafr Al-Batin, who passed away after being admitted to ICU at the beginning of this week [week of 10 Jun 2013].


#10 Dewtey

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 06:52 AM

4 months, that is a deadline to focus the medical folks efforts. Emphasis on Dead.

Edited by Dewtey, 14 June 2013 - 06:52 AM.

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#11 DocM

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 06:45 PM

Latest coronavirus research reveals important differences between new virus and SARS

New research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases provides the first complete viral load profile— a comprehensive clinical description of where and how much of the virus circulates through the body— of a patient infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

The report describes a 73-year-old man from Abu Dhabi, who died in Munich in April 2013, having contracted MERS-CoV a few weeks earlier.

Little comprehensive clinical data on the new virus exists, and this is only the fifth patient for whom the virus's progression and characteristics have been described in a medical journal. The patient described in the new paper entered hospital in Abu Dhabi 2 days after developing flu-like symptoms, where he was diagnosed with pneumonia and received antibiotics and artificial ventilation. On the 12th day of illness, the patient was flown to hospital in Munich. After experiencing deteriorating respiratory symptoms, and suffering kidney failure, the patient died, 18 days after becoming ill.

After admission to the Munich hospital, researchers regularly measured the patient's viral load, finding it to be highest in the lower respiratory tract, supporting earlier findings and current World Health Organization advice that specimens from this area should be obtained for diagnosis wherever possible. Low, but detectable, viral loads were also found in urine and stool samples, but not in the patient's blood.

The presence of the virus in urine may indicate that it is able to replicate in a patient's kidneys, which may also explain why this patient— and two other patients in France, described in a recent Lancet article1—experienced kidney failure. However, the researchers point out that the antibiotics prescribed in the early stages of the patient's illness may have also affected kidney function, so more research will be needed to establish where and how the virus reproduces in the body after infection.

Low concentrations of the virus in stool samples also suggests a key difference between how the new virus circulates in the body compared with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, which tended to be found in high concentrations in stool. Learning more about where and how the virus circulates will have critical implications for diagnosis and infection control, say the authors. "Laboratory data like these are critical to reach recommendations for diagnostics, to make projections about the prognosis of the patient, as well as to estimate infection risks", says Professor Christian Drosten, a lead author of the study.

"In the absence of qualitative laboratory data from well-documented MERS cases, most of these considerations were up to now made upon an assumed analogy to SARS. However, we're now finding that certain elementary traits of the MERS virus appear to be different to SARS."

According to Professor Clemens-Martin Wendtner, co-lead author of the study, "With only five complete genome sequences so far available there is an urgent need for more genetic data to reveal the spatial and temporal distribution of these cases, estimate the number of independent human chains of transmission, and thus better evaluate the threat this virus poses to world health."

More information: 1. http://www.thelancet...IIS0140-6736(13)60982-4/fulltext

2. The Lancet Infectious Diseases Published online June 17, 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10...6/S1473-3099(13)70154-3

Provided by Lancet
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#12 silylene

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 12:17 PM

Seems the pace of cases is picking up, which is bad news. I need to get find a plot the case histories on a timeline.


Current: 64 cases, 38 deaths. (4 days ago this was 58/32)

Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !



MERS-COV - EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (29): SAUDI ARABIA, NEW CASES AND DEATHS
*************************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Date: Sun 16 Jun 2013
Source: Ministry of Public Health, Saudi Arabia [edited]
http://www.moh.gov.s...-06-16-001.aspx


Within the framework of the epidemiological surveillance of the novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the Ministry of Health (MOH) has announced that 3 new confirmed cases of this virus have been recorded. The 1st case is a 42-year-old Saudi citizen in the Eastern region, who is suffering from chronic asthma, and receiving proper treatment at the hospital. The 2nd case is a 63-year-old Saudi female in Riyadh Region, who is suffering from chronic diseases, and still in the ICU, receiving proper treatment. The 3rd case is a 2-year-old child in Jeddah, who is suffering from chronic pulmonary disease, and still in the ICU receiving proper treatment.

Furthermore, MOH has announced the deaths of 4 cases, who had been previously announced to be infected by this virus; 2 of them in the Taif and other 2 in the Eastern Region.

#13 silylene

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 03:00 PM

A slew of new cases since this morning, not good. The new cases all originate from one infected person who traveled from S. Arabia to Jordan and infected at least 9 additional people. The new cases were infected earlier, but just identified today. Another cluster, hopefully enough testing and hospital quarantine has been done to clamp this one down.

Current: 72 cases, 38 deaths. (6 hours ago this was 64/38)

Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !

~~~

MERS-COV - EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (31): JORDAN, RETROSPECTIVE CASE IDENTIFICATION, WHO, REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
**************************************************************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

In this update:
[1] Jordan - April 2012, 8 additional cases confirmed
[2] Saudi Arabia - WHO report on latest 3 cases and 4 deaths

******
[1] Jordan - April 2012, 8 additional cases confirmed
Date: 17 Jun 2013
Source: The Times Colonist [edited]
http://www.timescolo...people-1.323843


A retrospective study has shown that the earliest known outbreak of the MERS coronavirus infected at least 10 people [see ProMED-mail posts Novel coronavirus - Saudi Arabia (04): RFI, Jordan, April 2012 20120925.1308001 and Novel coronavirus - Eastern Mediterranean: WHO, Jordan, conf., RFI 20121130.1432498 for details on the outbreak in Jordan. - Mod.MPP].

Two of those cases, from an outbreak in Jordan in April of 2012, have been previously reported [Novel coronavirus - Eastern Mediterranean: WHO, Jordan, conf., RFI 20121130.1432498].

Edited by silylene, 17 June 2013 - 03:00 PM.


#14 Bill Slugg

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 04:53 PM

Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !


There is another pilgrimage called the Umrah that you can make any time of the year, but doing so the last two weeks of Ramadan is special. There is a yearly peak of visitors to Mecca almost as big as the Hajj. This year, the peak will be the last week of August first week of July.

#15 silylene

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 09:03 PM

There is a yearly peak of visitors to Mecca almost as big as the Hajj. This year, the peak will be the last week of August first week of July.


Oh, great. Just what we need.

#16 silylene

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 01:16 PM

Oh great... easier to transmit, and 50% fatality rate. SARS was just 8% fatality rate. MERS spread by sneezing and coughing. SARS spread by contact with bodily fluids, usually saliva or fecal contaminated water.

Just 1 month until the Umrah (Ramadan gathering in Mecca) starts !

Just 4 months until the Hajj starts !

One of the recent MERS clusters, all spreading within a hospital environment:
Posted Image

New MERS virus spreads easily, deadlier than SARS


LONDON (AP) — A mysterious new respiratory virus that originated in the Middle East spreads easily between people and appears more deadly than SARS, doctors reported Wednesday after investigating the biggest outbreak in Saudi Arabia.

More than 60 cases of what is now called MERS, including 38 deaths, have been recorded by the World Health Organization in the past year, mostly in Saudi Arabia. So far, illnesses haven't spread as quickly as SARS did in 2003, ultimately triggering a global outbreak that killed about 800 people.
An international team of doctors who investigated nearly two dozen cases in eastern Saudi Arabia found the new coronavirus has some striking similarities to SARS. Unlike SARS, though, scientists remain baffled as to the source of MERS.

In a worrying finding, the team said MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) not only spreads easily between people, but within hospitals. That was also the case with SARS, a distant relative of the new virus.

"To me, this felt a lot like SARS did," said Dr. Trish Perl, a senior hospital epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Medicine, who was part of the team. Their report was published online Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Perl said they couldn't nail down how it was spread in every case — through droplets from sneezing or coughing, or a more indirect route. Some of the hospital patients weren't close to the infected person, but somehow picked up the virus.

"In the right circumstances, the spread could be explosive," said Perl, while emphasizing that the team only had a snapshot of one MERS cluster in Saudi Arabia.

Cases have continued to trickle in, and there appears to be an ongoing outbreak in Saudi Arabia. MERS cases have also been reported in Jordan, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Tunisia. Most have had a direct connection to the Middle East region.

In the Saudi cluster that was investigated, certain patients infected many more people than would be expected, Perl said. One patient who was receiving dialysis treatment spread MERS to seven others, including fellow dialysis patients at the same hospital. During SARS, such patients were known as "superspreaders" and effectively seeded outbreaks in numerous countries.

Perl and colleagues also concluded that symptoms of both diseases are similar, with an initial fever and cough that may last for a few days before pneumonia develops.

But MERS appears far more lethal. Compared to SARS' 8 percent death rate, the fatality rate for MERS in the Saudi outbreak was about 65 percent, though the experts could be missing mild cases that might skew the figures.

While SARS was traced to bats before jumping to humans via civet cats, the source of the MERS virus remains a mystery. It is most closely related to a bat virus though some experts suspect people may be getting sick from animals like camels or goats. Another hypothesis is that infected bats may be contaminating foods like dates, commonly harvested and eaten in Saudi Arabia.

Doctors around the world have struggled to treat patients. "We need more information from other countries to find out what the best treatment is," said Dr. Clemens Wendtner, who treated a MERS patient who later died in Munich. "Our patient got everything possible and it still didn't help him."
Other experts said there are enough worrying signs about MERS that it can't yet be written off, despite the relatively small number of cases it has caused.

"As long as it is around, it has every opportunity at the genetic roulette table to turn into something more dangerous," said Michael Osterholm, an infectious diseases expert at the University of Minnesota.

WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan has previously called MERS the single biggest public health threat and acknowledged officials were "empty-handed" regarding prevention measures.

"We understand too little about this virus when viewed against the magnitude of its potential threat," she said last month in Geneva.
At a meeting this weekend in Cairo, WHO will meet with other experts to discuss MERS and to possibly develop guidelines for next month's Ramadan, when millions of Muslim pilgrims will be visiting Saudi Arabia.

Edited by silylene, 20 June 2013 - 01:19 PM.


#17 Dewtey

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Posted 20 June 2013 - 05:22 PM

Crud

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#18 silylene

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 09:27 AM

"We continue to kiss each other when we meet relatives and friends...."

Source: http://www.thenational.ae/news/world...fades-in-saudi

Panic over Mers coronavirus fades in Saudi
Agence France-Presse
Jun 20, 2013

AL HOFUF, Saudi Arabia, // People in Saudi Arabia's Eastern Province have again started greeting friends with the traditional kiss on the cheek, and face masks in public are becoming rarer, as panic subsides over the outbreak of a deadly respiratory disease that hit the country last year.

"We continue to kiss each other when we meet relatives and friends, and we organise evenings without wearing masks or taking any precautionary measures," said Badr Abdullah, as he bought groceries at a shopping centre in Al Hofuf, the main city in Al Ahsa governorate.

"At the beginning, panic hit us. But now, the situation is back to normal," Mr Abdullah said...

#19 Dewtey

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 11:15 AM

"At the beginning, panic hit us. But now, the situation is back to normal," Mr Abdullah said...


Really? What info do they have we don't?

... If you have to add anything to your coffee, you should probably switch to tea...
 
Ex-bureaucrat, at your service

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#20 silylene

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 12:22 PM

"At the beginning, panic hit us. But now, the situation is back to normal," Mr Abdullah said...


Really? What info do they have we don't?


Insha'Allah?

In sha'Allah is said when speaking about plans and events expected to occur in the future. The phrase also acknowledges submission to God, with the speaker putting him or herself into God's hands. Muslims believe that everything is maktub [lit.: written] and so whatever it is one wishes to do, will only occur if it is within God's plan.

In the Qur'an, Muslims are told that they should never say they will do a particular thing in the future without adding insha'Allah to the statement. Surat Al Kahf (18):23-24

#21 Dewtey

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 12:56 PM

Well, then, let them continue as before. When they start dropping like flies in a Black Flag test room, they'll rethink things a bit?

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#22 Mee_n_Mac

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 08:39 PM

Well, then, let them continue as before. When they start dropping like flies in a Black Flag test room, they'll rethink things a bit?

Allahu Akbar.
Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity or ignorance. The latter are a lot more common than the former.

#23 silylene

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 12:50 PM

The outbreak has leveled off a bit in the last few days (although there are reports of 4 more cases, I am waiting for confirmations)

Posted Image

The 'jumpiness' of this plot is the result of several 'superspreaders' being the origin of most case clusters.

I spoke too soon. 7 more relatively asymptomatic cases reported last night.

http://afludiary.blo...-cov-cases.html

#24 silylene

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 03:42 PM

Fears of MERS virus at Muslim hajj pilgrimage

AFP - Virologists are casting a worried eye on this year's Islamic hajj pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia as they struggle with the enigmatic, deadly virus known as MERS which is striking hardest in the kingdom.

...for any respiratory virus the mass gathering of the hajj provides a perfect opportunity to first spread at the two holiest Muslim shrines in the cities of Mecca and Medina, and then travel around the globe at jet speed as pilgrims return home.
The 2012 hajj drew 3.1 million people -- and this year's event likewise occurs in October, as the northern hemisphere slides into the season for coughs and sneezes.


UN World Health Organisation (WHO) head Margaret Chan sounded the alarm to ministers at the agency's annual congress in May.


"We need to get the facts clear and get the appropriate advice to all your countries where your pilgrims want to go to Mecca. It is something quite urgent," she said.


....Forty MERS patients have died to date, an extremely high rate of 52 percent, compared to nine percent of the 8,273 recorded patients with SARS, which was centred on Asia.


2012 Hajj crowds (3.1 million!) converging on the Masjid Al-Haram mosque. The traditional Arabic greeting is an embrace and a kiss:

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#25 XZG 1138

XZG 1138

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 10:08 PM

The hospitals in Dearborn could get busy.
'The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle.' - (John) Stapp's Law
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Religion is not the opiate of the masses, corporate pop culture is.




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